The state-wide expansion of school-choice vouchers will undermine public education funding: Benjamin Helton – MyGeeksGuide
Categories
News

The state-wide expansion of school-choice vouchers will undermine public education funding: Benjamin Helton

Cleveland, Ohio-A recent Carson v. Makin ruling by the US Supreme Court entitles private religious schools to receive public money to please those who support the choice of public school.

School choice is currently a limited part of Ohio’s education policy. The EdChoice program allows students attending a “failed” public school to receive a taxpayer-funded voucher called a “scholarship” and attend a private school.

Vouchers are currently worth $ 5,500 for K-8 students and $ 7,500 for high school students.

Although the current program is relatively small, the bill currently being submitted to the House Finance Commission, HB 290, aims to extend the EdChoice program to all Ohio students. If the bill is passed, it will be devastating to Ohio public school students, especially rural students.

A common question posed by advocates of school choice is, “Why does giving family choice undermine funding public schools?”

Proponents say the bill to expand the voucher program across the state gives all families a “choice” and that voucher funding comes from a different budget than public school dollars.

Both claims are clearly false, according to how these voucher invoices work theoretically and empirically.

Dr. Benjamin Helton is a former public school teacher and is currently an assistant professor of music education at Case Western Reserve University. He teaches incumbent and incumbent music teachers and conducts research on art education policy.

Dr. Benjamin Helton is a former public school teacher and is currently an assistant professor of music education at Case Western Reserve University. He teaches incumbent and incumbent music teachers and conducts research on art education policy.

First, local schools cannot benefit from the school selection bill and only lose money. With the exception of local public schools, local communities have few formal educational options. How can a voucher help if the nearest private school is more than an hour’s drive away?

ALSO READ:  International Girls in ICT Day 2022 | Microsoft ADC West Africa inspires schoolgirls & female tech enthusiasts

Also, it is unlikely that charter schools, other places where vouchers may be used, will suddenly appear in rural areas. There is no market.

Just as the rural areas of Ohio depend on the United States Postal Service, they also depend on local public schools.

The online charter school option is an irresponsible use of taxpayer money due to the history of corruption in online charter schools operated in Ohio.

Second, the voucher program adds cost to an already tight budget. Parents who have already sent their children to an independent school or are planning to send them to a private kindergarten can easily get a voucher for their children. Ohio has about 211,000 private school students. If 25% of those students receive a $ 5,500 voucher, it will cost about $ 290 million.

According to a recent financial analysis of the Ohio Legislative Services Commission on the HB538, the current EdChoice Voucher Program will incur a $ 738 loss in each student’s school district receiving a voucher.

If 10% of Ohio’s 1.8 million public school students use this program through the HB 290, the state’s education budget will be lost by nearly $ 133 million. These two budget concerns result in losses of over $ 400 million that must come from somewhere. And that “somewhere” is the state’s education budget.

The lack of a turnaround in rural Ohio on the HB 290 also explains why its key sponsors, Upper Sandusky Republican Riordan McClain and Shelby Republican Marilyn S. John, named them. I am asking questions.

Both mainly represent rural areas. Mansfield, a city in the John district with a population of 46,000, is by far the largest municipality in either district. Why do they do nothing to help their local members and sponsor a bill that most children in their district will raise money from the school they always attend?

ALSO READ:  OPPO Launched the A57 with a 5G Model as new mid-range Smartphone

The potential benefits of vouchers are left to urban areas where there are many options. This is a completely different area than both the McLean and John districts.

Public education continues to be one of the best investments in Ohio taxes. For all Ohio students, and especially for the Ohio countryside, the HB 290 is opposed and must vote against it.

The Ohio Parliament should continue to fund Ohio public schools and avoid exchanging the future of Ohio students for snake oil sold in school selection lobbies.

Dr. Benjamin Helton is a former public school teacher and is currently an assistant professor of music education at Case Western Reserve University. He teaches incumbent and incumbent music teachers and conducts research on art education policy.

Do you have anything to say about this topic?

* Please send a letter to the editor. This is considered a printed matter publication.

* If you have any general questions about our editorial board, or comments or corrections regarding this column of opinions, please email Elizabeth Sullivan, Opinion Director at esullivan@cleveland.com.

By Author Moses

Authormoses is the CEO and Chief Editor of MyGeeksGuide. We serve you with Reliable Information around the Technology World. (Tech & Gadgets Enthusiast) Follow Us on Social Media.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.